Croatia

A Dream Or…

The description of Croatia’s 2013 National Pavilion states the following: “Through the dreams we create narratives of an arbitrary hierarchy and express the resistance to the image of the world which is conformist and imposed by the society.”

We dreamt that the state withdrew from the financing of culture, that art and culture were no longer considered public needs. We dreamt that the artistic field was given over to private financiers: entrepreneurs in the so-called creative industries and banks which opened new lines of credit intended for artistic activities. We dreamt that the Law on Cultural Institutions, which bound the state and its cities to finance the operation of public institutions, was repealed, which led to mass layoffs for cultural workers. We dreamt that by 2016 the state budget only included archives, libraries, and but a few museums of national importance. We dreamt that the state stopped collecting contemporary art and that artworks were passed into private hands, that public access to artworks was limited, that they were converted into commodities and served solely to generate profit.

Wake up, artists!

(Based on media statements by the Croatian Ministry of Culture government officials during the last few years.)

BLOK curatorial collective (Ana Kutlesa, Vesna Vukovic, Ivana Hanacek)

http://venicebiennale2013.ideologicalguide.com/wp/wp-content/uploads/2013/06/venetie_small_2x.jpg

Pavilion

Artist:
Kata Mijatović
Curator:
Branko Franceschi

Curator

Name:
Branko Franceschi
Gender:
Male
Born:
Croatia, 1959
Lives and works in:
Croatia
No. of participations in the venice biennale:
2

Artist

Name:
Kata Mijatović
Gender:
Female
Born:
Croatia, 1956
Lives and works in:
Croatia
No. of participations in the venice biennale:
1
Represented by galleries in:
Zagreb

Politics & Economics

State System:
Unitary parliamentary constitutional republic
Ruling Political Party:
Centre-left neo-liberal pro-Europe coalition of the Social Democratic Party, the Croatian People's Party - Liberal Democrats, Istrian Democratic Assembly and Croatian Party of Pensioners.
Population (World Bank, 2011):
4,403,000
GDP per capita (World Bank, 2011):
$14,193
Unemployment (World Bank, 2011):
13.4% of the labor force
World Bank credit:
$1,060,000,000
Net OECD ODA Aid Received (2011):
$160,360,000
Military Expenditure (SIPRI, 2011):
$959,000,000

Alliances


World Bank debt
International Criminal Court recognized
NATO
Non-Aligned Movement
WTO

Conflicts

Country independent since:
1991 (from Yugoslavia)
Last Major Border Revision:
1947 (Paris Peace Treaty, inclusion of most of Istria)
International Court of Justice cases:
1
Global Militarization Index (BICC, 2011):
40
Nuclear Force?
No
Ongoing Conflicts and Disputes:
Croatia is set to become an EU member on the first of July 2013. Although significant progress is being made, the October 2012 EU monitoring report noted that Croatia needs to intensify efforts to tackle impunity for war crimes, to protect Serb and Roma minorities, and to ensure LGBT rights. Croatia has long-standing border disputes with Slovenia, Montenegro, Bosnia and Herzegovina, and Serbia. Only in 2010 Slovenia accepted the ruling of international arbitrators on the case, removing the blockade of Croatia's EU accession.
Participation in Multinational Missons:
NATO missions in Afghanistan and Kosovo. UN peacekeeping missions in Congo, Cyprus, Haiti, Kosovo, Lebanon, Liberia, and India & Pakistan.