Costa Rica

Costa Rica’s Smoking Gun

Just as the national pavilion model seemed to be on its last legs, the Costa Rican Pavilion made its appearance in Venice. It was 2011 when the Costa Rican Embassy in Rome adopted a private initiative and turned it into a national pavilion. That same year, nationalist discourses had intensified as a result of a diplomatic conflict between Costa Rica and Nicaragua that revolved around sovereignty, the environment, and drug trafficking. This conflict was politically instrumentalized on both sides of the San Juan River, which forms a natural border between the two states. None of this was mentioned at the time; but it returns, just like the latent border conflict.

“I want to kill you, but you stole my gun.” These words, heard in a dream, sparked the works by Priscilla Monge at the 55th Venice Biennale. What if we were to read them as being aimed at the event itself? What weapons does its promised approval take away from us?

Tamara Díaz Bringas

http://venicebiennale2013.ideologicalguide.com/wp/wp-content/uploads/2013/06/venetie_small_2x.jpg

Pavilion

Organizer/Commissioner:
Francesco Elisei & Museo de Arte y Diseno Contemporaneo
Artists:
Priscilla Monge; Esteban Piedra León; Rafael Ottón Solís; Cinthya Soto
Curator:
Francisco Córdoba

Curator

Name:
Francisco Córdoba
Gender:
Male
Born:
Costa Rica, 1958
Lives and works in:
Italy
No. of participations in the venice biennale:
2

Artist

Name:
Cinthya Soto
Gender:
Female
Born:
Costa Rica , 1969
Lives and works in:
Costa Rica and Switzerland
No. of participations in the venice biennale:
2

Artist

Name:
Rafael Ottón Solís
Gender:
Male
Born:
Costa Rica, 1946
Lives and works in:
Costa Rica
No. of participations in the venice biennale:
1

Artist

Name:
Esteban Piedra León
Gender:
Male
Born:
Costa Rica, 1978
No. of participations in the venice biennale:
1

Artist

Name:
Priscilla Monge
Gender:
Female
Born:
Costa Rica, 1968
Lives and works in:
Costa Rica
No. of participations in the venice biennale:
2

Politics & Economics

State System:
Unitary presidential constitutional republic
Ruling Political Party:
Centre-left social-democratic conservative National Liberation Party
Population (World Bank, 2011):
4,726,575
GDP per capita (World Bank, 2011):
$8,647
Unemployment (World Bank, 2011):
7.7% of the labor force
World Bank credit:
$209,410,000
Net OECD ODA Aid Received (2011):
$38,430,000

Alliances


World Bank debt
International Criminal Court recognized
Non-Aligned Movement
WTO

Conflicts

Country independent since:
1821 (from Spain)
Last Major Border Revision:
1824 (Nicoya joins Costa Rica)
Colonial History:
Former Spanish colony
International Court of Justice cases:
4
Global Militarization Index (BICC, 2011):
No ranking
Nuclear Force?
No
Participation in Multinational Missons:
Costa-Rica abolished its army in 1949